Posts tagged with understanding cultural differences

Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for RUSSIA

Posted on January 11, 2015 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: RUSSIARussia2

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for Russia is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Russia, tips for communicating in Russia, and strategies for doing business with Russia to help with understanding the culture in Russia. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Addresses in Russia are written in the following order: (1) country (2) city (3) street address and (4) the last name of the individual.

Handshaking is common and is typically a firm grip with several quick pumps between two men. Between men and women, or two women, the handshake is usually softer. It’s appropriate for men to wait until a woman extends her hand before reaching for it. Between women, the older woman extends her hand first.

Russians are a very demonstrative people, and public physical contact is common. Hugs, backslapping, kisses on the cheeks, and other expressive gestures are common among friends and relatives when greeting.

When a Russian touches another person during a greeting or conversation, it is usually a sign of confidence and rapport.

Generally speaking, Russians are more comfortable with third-party introductions, so it’s best to wait a moment before introducing yourself to a new group. If, after a few minutes, no introduction is made you may then take the initiative.

Eye contact during the introduction is very important and should be maintained as long as the individual is addressing you.

Visitors should speak in a calm moderate tone of voice since speaking or laughing loudly in public is frowned upon.

Personal questions are best avoided, although you may be subject to these inquiries. Answer these questions as best as you are willing to since your Russian companions may press you for details.

There is tremendous affection for children in Russia. If you are a parent, showing photographs of your children can be an effective way of building rapport.

In conversation, it is helpful to discuss your aspirations and hopes for the future. Sometimes, Russians are far more interested in the personal side of your character than your business agenda.

Allow plenty of time for each appointment. Not only may appointments start late, they may last longer than originally planned.

The Russian business culture has a deeply entrenched hierarchy. Superiors have authority over their subordinates, and are ultimately responsible for the final decision.

It’s essential that you deal with the key decision-makers, rather than the go-betweens who are often sent to meet with new visitors. It’s wise to plan ahead and make the right contacts well in advance of your trip.

When decision-makers are present, meetings can be a time for all participants to exchange information and ideas.

Ensure that you have a contact outside of the negotiations who is an expert in Russian law, which is constantly subject to change in both interpretation and application.

The first meeting is usually more of a formality, a time for the Russians to assess the credibility of you and your company. The best strategy is to appear very firm and dignified, while maintaining an air of warmth and approachability.

It’s essential that your business team display a “united front” when negotiating with the Russians. A good way to start is by ensuring that all members of your team understand and agree on precisely what they want to achieve from the deal.

While strong empirical evidence and other factual data are important in any presentation, making a trustworthy impression is an important priority with Russians.

Extend compliments with caution, since they may cause Russians to feel a sense of misplaced obligation. Praising and rewarding anyone in public may be viewed with suspicion.

Your Russian counterparts may insist that they understand something while this may not actually be the case. They also sometimes have a tendency to say things they think you want to hear.

The Russian word “nyekulturny” is a popular term used to refer to anything considered uncultured, bad mannered, or otherwise socially unacceptable. The taboos below are a few examples of some behaviors regarded as “nyekulturny.”

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Tips

  • The rapid, progressive changes taking place in Russia
  • Culture, theatre, movies, music, and literature
  • Travel, history, and architecture
  • There is always an interest in current events as long as you remain open to various perspectives
  • The food and drink that is unmistakably a part of Russian entertainment

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Taboos

  • Wearing your coat inside office buildings or public places. Coatrooms are usually available and should be used.
  • Standing with your hands in your pockets
  • Sitting with the legs apart, or with one ankle resting upon the knee
  • Comparing Russia to other developing countries, or comparing Moscow and Saint Petersburg
  • Beckoning someone with the forefinger. Instead, turn your hand so that the palm faces down and make a scratching motion. Many common gestures used in the West, such as the “OK” sign, are considered rude in Russia.

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for SAUDI ARABIA!

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for Russia, doing business in Russia, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book 

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for RUSSIA

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: Communication Guidelines for PORTUGAL

Posted on November 22, 2014 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: PORTUGAL Portugal2

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for Portugal is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Portugal, tips for communicating in Portugal, and strategies for doing business with Portugal to help with understanding the culture in Portugal. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Cultural Tips for Portugal

Business travel tips for Portugal that will pave the way!

When doing business in Portugal, conversation is somewhat informal, however still more formal than in the US when first meeting. It’s best to begin more formal, and then adapt to a more casual style as the relationship develops.

You can assume that most Portuguese business contacts will speak some English. They will also typically understand Spanish however Spanish speakers won’t necessarily understand Portuguese, because the pronunciation is especially difficult.

It’s typical to shake hands when greeting, and on a first meeting to exchange business cards. There may be more touching of arms or hands during handshake introductions that in northern European or the US cultures.

Developing good personal relationships is very important in business and will often be at least as significant a factor as the product or service you are offering.

People stand closer in conversation than in North America Northern Europe and maintain good eye contact.

In general, the Portuguese are relaxed about etiquette and public behavior, however it is considered impolite to stretch in public. Being polite and well behaved is what really matters.

Do not launch straight into the business at hand. Allow some time for small talk about business in general, about soccer, about the weather, or about your personal life and family.

If you want to get to know your business partners better, invite them for a cup of coffee, lunch, or dinner. This should be a time to socialize, so don’t bring up business unless they do first.

The Portuguese are rather reserved and prefer to avoid confrontation or verbal directness. You may find it difficult to get definite answers to all your questions. Try to get information by analyzing the statements being made.

Meetings tend to run long, and do not necessarily keep to an agenda or timetable. Gently focus the discussion or bring it to closure, but allow plenty of room for people to say what they have to say.

Never shout or lose your temper–it doesn’t work and ends up putting you in a weaker position.

The Portuguese have an instinct to please which also produces a tendency to say what they think you want to hear. Make sure you get specifics and quantification.

For negotiations, the key is patience and a willingness to educate your business partners about your way of doing things. The ‘carrot’ is generally more effective than the ‘stick’.

Overall, there is a willingness to be flexible and to learn. There is respect and admiration for more advanced methods and economies. You will find that there is considerable creativity and drive to resolve problems and adaptation to circumstances.

Status is important to the Portuguese. The use of academic titles and distinctions are very common. Job title and rank are less significant, although it is important to know the business hierarchy and who really makes the decision.

Consensus and a ‘win-win’ attitude is typically the underlying philosophy. The Portuguese are uncomfortable with explicitly competitive positions.

Teamwork may be weaker than in some cultures, because the Portuguese don’t like challenging authority. They also tend first to analyze their personal interest in an action or deal, so understanding ‘hidden agendas’ is an important skill.

The most important environmental factor is the bureaucracy and weak justice system. Labor laws are very tough, and there is a culture of state involvement in business and collectivist policies.

Portuguese businesspeople are expert at dealing with the last minute crisis. There is always someone around who will fix it or find a creative way through. Of course, the solution may not be completely inadequate–but a solution will be found.

Make sure you clarify specific and realistic deadlines and performance measures. ‘Tomorrow’ and ‘next week’ are relative terms in Portuguese. You’ll have to confirm that the deadlines are on track before you find that they have come and gone.

It’s necessary to have all agreements and commitments in writing, even if only an e-mail confirmation. Avoid writing anything in red ink, even small notes, because only school teachers correcting work are ‘allowed’ to write in red–otherwise it’s considered offensive.

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Tips

  • Soccer is a favorite topic of most all Portuguese
  • Food and wine, especially Portuguese wine
  • Family, your home, and children
  • Culture, music, and literature
  • Travel, history, and architecture

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Taboos

  • Religion, and all the usual controversial subjects
  • Politics in general
  • Personal finances, salary, career positions etc.
  • Personal compliments early in the relationship
  • Sports, other than soccer, may not be well recognized by some Portuguese

Bon Voyage! 

Join us in the future for Russia!

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for Portugal, doing business in Portugal, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for PORTUGAL

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

What World Leaders and Business Travelers Need to Know About Visiting China!

Posted on November 15, 2014 by 1 Comment

Cultural Tips for Visiting China 

What World Leaders and Business Travelers Need to Know! 

Success leaves clues, or in this case the lack of success leaves clues! Throughout history we’ve witnessed presidential “faux pas”, and this time President Obama added himself to the list when arriving in Beijing for the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

He can be excused for choosing the security of a U.S. supplied vehicle over the Chinese-provided limousine service, however when he emerged from his vehicle chewing gum, I had to question the cultural preparation he had received for his visit. Although he frequently chews Nicorette gum to manage his smoking habit, this doesn’t bode well with the formal standards of the Chinese party leadership. He was unfortunately characterized as an “idler” and “rapper” on Chinese social media.

Chewing gum is considered impolite in China, but chewing gum wasn’t the only misstep. Upon his arrival, he shook hands and patted the backs of the Chinese delegates who greeted him. While those pats on the back are considered a sign of comradery and friendship in the U.S., they aren’t appreciated the same way in the Chinese culture.

The Chinese Communist Party launched a six-month campaign to educate the Beijing delegation on how to behave when welcoming world leaders for its biggest international event since the 2008 Summer Olympics. It was surprising that the leader of the most powerful nation in the world was the first to make headlines for cultural missteps.

A few tips on the cultural protocol in China could have avoided this embarrassment. World leaders and business travelers alike should keep the following points in mind when visiting China.

  • Avoid using any excessively demonstrative behavior or gesture. Don’t raise your voice too loud, or snap your fingers, wink, or whistle.
  • Chewing gum in public — especially at official or formal occasions, is considered impolite and uncultured.
  • China is not a “touching” culture, so avoid back patting, putting an arm around someone’s shoulders, hugs, and so on.
  • Handshaking is done with a rather gentle grip because a very firm handshake suggests aggression.
  • Good eye contact is appropriate, although it won’t be prolonged. The Chinese culture is taught to avert their eyes to avoid the intimidation.
  • Point with an open hand because pointing with an index finger is considered impolite.
  • Don’t blow your nose in a handkerchief or tissue and then put it in your pocket or handbag. This is considered unsanitary.
  • Don’t cause any type of embarrassment that could result in “loss of face”. “Face” is a bankable notion that is literally a statement of a person’s value.
  • Gentlemen — don’t cross your legs with your foot resting on your knee. It is considered disrespectful, and you may inadvertently point the sole of your shoe at someone – a real insult!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for international business, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for PORTUGAL

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: Communication Guidelines for POLAND

Posted on October 18, 2014 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: POLANDPoland-2

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for Poland is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Poland, tips for communicating in Poland, and strategies for doing business with Poland to help with understanding the culture in Poland. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Cultural Tips for Polandincluding some valuable business travel tips!

When doing business in Poland, learn some basic Polish words, like hello “dzien dobry”, good bye “do widzenia”, excuse me “przepraszam”, and thank you “dziekuje”. A basic Polish language guide can help you with proper pronunciation

The standard greeting is a firm handshake. The same applies to farewells. Kissing and hugging are reserved for very good friends.

There is no general rule as to how Polish people address each other. In initial contacts they may use the person’s title or surname however, after two or three meetings the use of first names is welcomed.

Polish people are sensitive to body language and watch it carefully. Avoid overly demonstrative or closed off body language. Smile, be yourself, and be moderately expressive as you speak.

It is good to maintain direct eye contact during a conversation. Be sincere, genuine, and avoid sounding egocentric.

Polish businesspeople love to conduct discussions on a wide range of topics including public life, family and career. To generate conversation, ask open-ended questions starting with who, what, where, when, why, and how.

The more you converse with someone Polish, the more gesture oriented they may become. Typical business standoffishness may eventually transform into a friendly conversation with backslapping!

If you are in a group, avoid conducting private conversations. It is better to involve everyone in the discussion.

Be punctual. If you cannot be on time, be sure to inform everyone about the circumstances which have delayed you, otherwise you may appear unreliable.

When entering a meeting room, wait for your host to indicate where you are going to sit. If there are people you do not know, wait for your host to carry out the introductions.

Polish negotiations tend to be reserved. Periods of silence during negotiations are not unusual. Do not try to fill the silence with unnecessary talk. The essential information is what counts.

The Polish will usually negotiate with a group of individuals rather than just one. If you gain their trust, it will typically be followed up by a contract.

Be thoroughly prepared for any meeting or negotiation, and make sure you have the authority to make concessions from your side.

In addition to Polish, English or German are the languages of most business transactions.

Every kind of meeting starts with some small talk. This socializing allows everybody to relax and make a good impression.

Be patient. In Poland, the decision making process is slower than in North America. Be prepared to have several meetings before finalizing a business deal.

According to Polish business etiquette, gifts are given at the beginning of a relationship, especially when contacts are made for the first time, and at the end of a successful business venture.

The best gifts are always items which are typical of your culture. If you are from Switzerland, you could buy some carefully chosen chocolate. Another good gift is a book describing your country or the region you are from which adds a personal touch.

If you want to get to know your business partners better, invite them for a cup of coffee, lunch, or dinner. This should be a time to socialize, so don’t bring up business unless they do first.

A toast is usually performed before or after eating. If you propose a toast it is important to maintain eye contact. Do not begin drinking until your host has proposed a toast. If your host stands when proposing a toast, so should you. In Poland the common toast is ‘na zdrowie!’

It is important to show special consideration to the elderly. For example, when public transportation becomes crowded, younger people are expected to give up their seats to the elderly.

5 Key Conversation Tips

  • Your home country, city, and way of life
  • Your education and work experience
  • Humorous anecdotes and stories are always appreciated
  • Hobbies and things of personal interest
  • Art, music, and culture

5 Key Conversation Taboos

  • Politics in general, unless they bring it up first
  • Emphasizing or boasting about money and wealth
  • Avoid speaking with your hands in your pockets
  • Religion in general, unless they bring it up first
  • Don’t sit with one ankle resting on the other knee

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for Portugal!

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for Poland, doing business in Poland, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for POLAND

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: Communication for The PHILIPPINES

Posted on September 6, 2014 by 2 Comments

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: PHILIPPINESPhilippines

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for The Philippines is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for The Philippines, tips for communicating in The Philippines, and strategies for doing business with The Philippines to help with understanding the culture in The Philippines. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazonas a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished ProfessionalKeynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Cultural Tips for The Philippinesincluding some valuable business travel tips!

When doing business in the Philippines, understand that it represents a variety of cultures. It’s in the heart of South East Asia, however is heavily influenced by non-Asians from Spain, Mexico, and the United States. As a result, the Catholic Church is more influential than in other Asian cultures, making the Philippines a truly unique and diverse country.

The majority of inhabitants are of ethnic Malay stock, although unlike neighboring countries such as Malaysia and Indonesia, the influence of Islam is more limited.

‘Small talk’ is an important part of establishing business relationships with Filipinos. You’ll find that they can be quite enthusiastic conversationalists.

Expect to be asked personal questions regarding your marital status, income, religion, and other sensitive subjects. If you don’t wish to answer, side-step these questions as graciously as possible.

Embarrassing someone, or reprimanding them in front of others, can cause them to “lose face” or loss of reputation and this has very negative consequences in this culture.

Maintaining cordial relationships is essential in the Philippines. Keep your comments as positive as possible, because negativity can inadvertently cause “loss of face”,

It’s best not to be too direct when communicating with Filipinos. They will usually be more receptive to a rather indirect approach.

Because of the years of U.S. military presence in the Philippines, most westernized gestures and communication styles are recognized and understood.

English is the language of most business transactions and nearly all government bodies in the Philippines.

Women are accepted in business circles, however should avoid acting in a domineering way with male colleagues.

Women managers are expected to be highly competent and assert their authority in a professional, restrained manner.

Business travelers are expected to be on time for all appointments, and although the Filipinos may not always arrive exactly on time, you probably won’t be subjected to an overly long wait.

Producing “instant results” is not a strong part of Filipino business culture. Consequently, you will have to adjust your expectations regarding deadlines and decision making when working with them.

In order to reach the decision-maker, you will likely have to meet with subordinates first and also adapt to the business protocol at the different levels of the organization.

When meeting a new customer, letters of introduction from friends and business associates can often be helpful in opening doors.

Although there are many social inequalities in the Philippines, Filipinos believe that everyone must be treated with respect. They are expected to behave with modesty and graciousness, especially in their dealings with the poor or less fortunate.

Businessmen should expect to shake hands firmly with other Filipino men both upon introduction and subsequent meetings however, it’s best to wait for a Filipino woman to offer her hand first.

Close female friends may greet each other with a hug and kiss. Similarly, close male friends may have close physical contact, such as holding hands or walking arm in arm around a friend’s shoulder.

Some Filipinos may greet each other by making eye contact, then raising and lowering their eyebrows. When someone raises their eyebrows at you, it is often a way of indicating that you have been understood.

Raising one’s voice is unacceptable in the Filipino business culture. It’s important to maintain a low, controlled tone of voice at all times.

Don’t assume that a smile is an indication of amusement or approval. At times, smiling is used to mask embarrassment, nervousness, and other feelings of discomfort.

Pointing at someone or something can be perceived as an insulting gesture. Filipinos typically point at objects using an open hand. For giving directions, they may use a glance with a slight nod, or purse their lips to signify which way.

To beckon someone, hold your hand out, palm downward, and make a scratching motion with the fingers. Beckoning someone with the palm up and wagging one finger can be interpreted as an insult.

Indicating ‘two’ with the fingers is done by holding up the ring and little finger, not the forefinger and middle finger. The thumb is not used to count numbers in the Philippines.

Don’t put your hands on your hips when conversing. This gesture can be misinterpreted as challenge to another person.

5 Key Conversation Topics or Gesture Tips

  • Discussing the Filipino culture and customs is always appreciated
  • Family is also a good topic in the Philippines
  • Filipinos love fiestas, so asking about these occasions will create a lively conversation
  • All types of sports, especially basketball
  • Food and the local specialties is a great topic

5 Key Conversation Topics or Gesture Taboos

  • Politics in general, unless they bring it up first
  • Corruption, terrorism, or drug trafficking — even though it may be in the news
  • Foreign aid and related policies
  • Religion in general, unless they bring it up first
  • Topics that could potentially cause embarrassment or “loss of face”

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for Poland! 

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for The Philippines, doing business in The Philippines, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’available on Amazonas a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for The PHILIPPINES

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Check Out My Recent Interview ‘Staying Connected as a Telecommuter’

Posted on July 26, 2014 by Leave a comment

Staying Connected As a Telecommuter: Refine Your Communication Skills! 

The interview featured on Careeranista.com at the following links:

Careeranista.com-Staying connected as a Telecommuter

http://www.careeranista.com/Articles/staying-connected-as-a-telecommuter.html

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available onAmazonas a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished ProfessionalKeynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Video clips: Speaker preview for Gayle Cotton

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website:SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for PERU

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SINGAPORE

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: Communication Guidelines for PERU

Posted on July 12, 2014 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: PERU

Peru-Machu Picchu2

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for Peru’ is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Peru, tips for communicating in Peru, and strategies for doing business with Peru to help with understanding the culture in peru. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished ProfessionalKeynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Cultural Tips for Peru – including some valuable business travel tips!

When doing business in Peru, be aware that you are likely to be at a higher altitude than you may be used to when you are in Peru, so give yourself a chance to get accustomed to it and prepare for possible altitude sickness.

Just as in many other Latin American countries, the concept of “Latin time” prevails. You will find your Peruvian contacts to be more flexible about time than people in many other parts of the world

Business attire is the standard in Peru. “Business casual” is not usually considered appropriate attire in Peru.

Body language and gestures are apt to be demonstrative and expressive, as is typical with many Latin American cultures.

Once a friendship has been established, men frequently greet each other with a hug, and women may kiss one another on the cheek. When you are greeted with more than a handshake, this is a sign that you have been accepted by these people.

Peruvians communicate in close proximity. When they stand nearby, do not back away, as you will offend them. Men also often walk arm in arm with other men, as do women with other women.

Since Peruvians value personal relationships and relate more to an individual business associates than a corporation, a local third party contact may be necessary. It may be best to establish the connection through a local mediator, or “enchufado”. They will be able to operate through the various networks that encompass Peruvian business and government.

Personal relationships are often more important than professional competence and experience. Personal identity is based on the social system and the history of one’s extended family. Building rapport is important to do before discussing business, as people tend to be more relationship oriented than goal oriented.

It’s best to have your business card printed in Spanish, since making this effort will please your Peruvian contacts. If you hold a title such as “Doctor”, “Engineer”, or “Professor”, it should be printed on your business card.

At each level of society, family is the cornerstone. Relationships define the key areas of trust and cooperation. At the highest levels of society, marriage and relationships solidify political and economic alliances.

Peruvians belong to a hierarchical culture where authority is expected to be respected, consequently titles are important and surnames may be used. In formal business settings, it’s best to wait until someone invites you to use first names.

Peruvians are very eager for foreign investment opportunities, so you will likely be received with warmth and openness. Be tactful and diplomatic in business associations. Peruvians tend to be rather indirect in their communication, so if you are too direct, they may discount what you have to say.

Even though many people may be involved in your meetings, the most senior manager in attendance will likely make the final decision. Consequently, it’s important to defer to that person and cultivate a relationship with them.

A system referred to as ‘cargo’ consists of a series of ranked offices, each of which has specific duties. Participation in the cargo system is essential to validate status and wealth in the eyes of the community, and to give an individual a feeling of security.

Peruvian women have made great strides in the world of business. However, men still conduct the majority of their business dealings. For this reason, business women should dress and act with great professionalism and be patient with any attitudes of machismo they may encounter.

During business negotiations, be prepared to discuss all aspects of the contract concurrently, rather than discussing individual aspects point-by-point. Also be prepared for seemingly irrelevant data to be reviewed and re-viewed. Try to be as polite as possible, ask questions, and avoid confrontations.

Avoid switching your company’s representatives during the negotiating process since Peruvians relate to the person they have come to know, not the organization.

Although bartering is frequently done in many Latin American countries, this is not necessarily the case in Peru. When discussing price, “I’m thinking” is a common gesture that is conveyed by tapping their head with their fingers.

When eating with Peruvians, it is considered proper to rest both hands on the table.

Crossing your legs by resting the ankle of one leg on the knee of the other is considered inappropriate. It’s best to cross your legs at the knee.

Refrain from motioning for someone to come near you by opening your hand and moving your finger or fingers toward you as this may be considered rude or even obscene. Instead, move your fingers back and forth with your hand facing the ground.

5 Key Conversation Topics or Gesture Tips

  • It’s considered appropriate to talk about family and children when getting to know each other
  • Discussing local traditions and cuisine
  • Talking about the sights you’ve seen in Peru, such as Machu-Picchu
  • Appreciation of the wealth of Peruvian history, art, and culture
  • Food and restaurants in the particular area you are visiting

5 Key Conversation Topics or Gesture Taboos

  • Inquiring about a person’s ancestry, especially if it is Indian
  • The Peruvian government and politics
  • Terrorist activity or drug trafficking
  • Criticism of Peru or Peruvian ways
  • Prices that have been paid for Peruvian items

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for the Philippines!

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for Peru, doing business in Peru, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website:SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboosfor the PHILIPPINES

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboosfor SINGAPORE

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

My Interview ‘5 Tips for Intercultural Communication’ is on ITIM Italy

Posted on June 21, 2014 by Leave a comment

My Interview ‘5 Tips for Intercultural Communication’ is on ITIM Italy 

When travelling to a new country, especially on business trips, it’s important to know the cultural customs and traditions of the people. Communication is so different from country to country that it’s essential to prepare in advance so you can be as successful as possible. It’s interesting to read the interview by Viaggiamo.it because you can notice the difference in the Italian communication style simply by reading the interview…

http://www.itimitaly.it/en/2238-five-tips-for-a-successful-intercultural-communication-interview-with-gayle-cotton.html

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communications’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book .She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Website:www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Video clips: Speaker preview for Gayle Cotton

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website:SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Coming on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for PERU

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SINGAPORE

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for NORWAY

Posted on June 6, 2014 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: NORWAYNorway-2

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for Norway’ is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Norway, tips for communicating in Norway, and strategies for doing business with Norway to help with understanding the Norwegian culture. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communications’. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Educationand a distinguished ProfessionalKeynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be the next conference speaker for your event! She travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland, and entertains and inspires audiences of all size with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette.

Cultural Tips for Norway – including some valuable business travel tips!

Punctuality is important. Norwegians appreciate punctuality for social engagements as well. If you must be late for any reason, make sure you call in advance and explain.

Standard business or business casual attire is the norm. It’s best for jewelry and accessories to be somewhat understated.

Tonality in business should be moderate. Norwegians prefer that people do not raise their voices when discussing something.

Body language, touching and gestures aren’t overly demonstrative, nor do Norwegians use extremes of expression in business.

Do not ask personal questions until asked first, and don’t be offended if Norwegians do not inquire about your family or work. This is a rather private culture and personal and business lives are often kept separate.

Norwegians accept silence as normal, so don’t hurriedly fill in pauses in the conversation. Also avoid superficial conversation.

All Scandinavians appreciate it if you can show knowledge of the differences between the people of Norway, Finland, Sweden, and Denmark.

During introductions, give a simple, firm handshake often with just one or two pumps. It’s not the norm to exchange gifts in ordinary meetings. Norwegians introduce themselves with their first name followed by their surname.

Many Norwegians have two given names and both are used as a ‘first’ name, for example Peter Marten or Selma Astrid. It is impolite to shorten the name to just the first of the two.

For business purposes, Norwegians sometimes introduce themselves by title if expected to do so. However when a relationship has been established, Norwegians usually move onto a first name basis.

There are few things Norwegians are openly offended by, and they regard themselves as worldly and unbiased. However, they do not appreciate loud or boisterous behavior in any context.

Norwegians prepare for meetings and expect you to have done the same. Punctuality is extremely important.

The Norwegian communication style is often seen as somewhat ‘direct’, and they will get to the point quickly and establish the boundaries before addressing the finer details. Facts and figures are very important and must be accurate.

Presentations should be concise, matter of fact and to the point. Any visuals or handouts should contain only the essential information.

In meetings and negotiations, Norwegians believe that everyone should be included and everyone should be given an opportunity to have a say. They consider and value all opinions.

Although negotiating teams may have a leader, they are not necessarily the main decision maker. Consensus after discussion is the goal, and because negotiating teams typically come to decisions as a group – negotiations can take longer.

There is a strong emphasis on equality and all members of a negotiating team are of equal value and status. Don’t be surprised if the lead is taken by a woman even when she is obviously younger than any of the men.

There is a high value placed on proven ability, and there is a defined management hierarchy.The authority to make a decision may be delegated down the management structure, however, there may also be a need to refer decisions sideways to ensure that all those affected have their say.

Norwegians have a great appreciation of nature and the environment. They make great efforts to protect their countryside and coastlines.

Norwegians are very hospitable and will invite you to their homes occasionally for dinner. Be sure to arrive promptly and take a bottle of wine, or flowers for the hostess.

The most common toast is ‘ skål’, pronounced ‘skoal.’ Do not sip your drink until the host or hostess has said ‘ skål ‘, and only then take your glass and raise it.

5 Key Conversation Topics or Gesture Tips

  • The Nobel Prize is a well-known feature of the Norwegian culture
  • Folk Music and Norwegian composers such as Grieg
  • Travel and experiences in other countries
  • Current events and politics – if you know what you’re talking about
  • Sports – especially football (soccer), biathlon, cross-country skiing, and rally driving

5 Key Conversation Topics or Gestures Taboos

  • Any criticism of the Norwegian government or culture
  • Discussing how much you earn or comparisons with pay scales in other countries
  • Paying compliments to people you have just met – compliments are typically well earned
  • Bragging or anything associated with rank, status and showiness
  • Avoid overly demonstrative expressions and body language

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for PERU!

To learn more about the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order Gayle’s bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ – now available as an Audio Book on Amazon!

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Website:www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom-Media-Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website:SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for PERU

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SCOTLAND

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for The NETHERLANDS

Posted on May 10, 2014 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: The NETHERLANDSNetherlands

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for The Netherlands’ is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for the Netherlands, tips for communicating in the Netherlands, and strategies for doing business with The Netherlands to help with understanding the dutch culture. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communications’She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Educationand a distinguished ProfessionalKeynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be the next conference speaker for your event! She travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland, and entertains and inspires audiences of all size with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette.

Cultural Tips for The NETHERLAND – including valuable business travel tips!

When doing business in The Netherlands, keep in mind that the Dutch don’t spend a lot of time socializing before a meeting or other business discussion. As soon as the necessary introductions are made, they will likely proceed with the business at hand.

Don’t call the Netherlands “Holland” since that term specifically refers to only two of the 12 provinces that make up the country.

Whether for business or social engagements punctuality is essential and expected in the Dutch business culture. If you know that you will be late, make sure to call in advance and excuse yourself with a valid reason.

Planning, regulating, and organizing are strong values in this culture so plan accordingly. The Dutch stress the importance of the efficient use of time so reliability is something that is highly valued. Any company that cannot quickly and promptly deliver a service upon request will have a difficult time succeeding with Dutch customers.

Upon introduction, repeat your last name while you are shaking hands. It’s not really part of the Dutch business culture to ask, “How are you?” Dutch businesspeople only ask this type of question to help visitors feel at ease.

When you have not been formally introduced to everyone at a business or social gathering, you should take the initiative to introduce yourself. Go around the room and shake hands with everyone while repeating your last name. Not doing this may leave a bad impression.

Very close friends sometimes lightly kiss each other on the cheeks when greeting. This is appropriate only when men kiss women or women kiss each other.

Generally, the Dutch are rather reserved and will avoid expansive gestures such as hugging and backslapping. Try to avoid touching others in public.

When talking, the Dutch usually stand further apart than North Americans, so stand about an arm’s length apart. Furniture arrangements reflect this so you may find yourself seated in a chair that seems unusually far away. Don’t move your chair closer, however, if this occurs.

Avoid standing with your hands in your pockets, or leaving your left hand in your pocket while shaking hands with your right as this is considered impolite.

The Dutch dislike ostentatious displays of wealth. Bragging about your income, lifestyle, or possessions will not impress the Dutch.They are wary of inflated claims, so use plenty of evidence and other data to persuade them of the merit of your products or ideas. A simple and direct presentation is appreciated.

In the Netherlands, most everyone you encounter will speak English. Don’t feel compelled to ask if someone speaks English because it is assumed and the Dutch dislike being questioned about it.

The Dutch customarily answer their phones simply by stating their last names. Don’t be offended by this directness in the Dutch telephone manner.

The Dutch respect qualities such as straightforwardness and honesty. In this culture, bluntness is preferred to deceptiveness or evasiveness. Consequently, when you really want to say “no”, tentative answers such as “I’ll consider it”, “We’ll see”, or “perhaps” are not acceptable.

Tolerating individual differences and diversity is an important part of the Dutch character. There is a prevailing belief that people should be free to live as they please as long as others remain unharmed.

Be polite to all service personnel because the Dutch culture emphasizes that everyone is equal, and no citizen is obliged to be another person’s servant. Never treat anyone Dutch in a patronizing way.

Be informed on recent political events, both in your own country and in the Netherlands, since the Dutch like discussing politics. However, avoid getting involved in a political discussion if you aren’t well informed.

Privacy is of key importance in the Netherlands, and whether at home or in the workplace doors are often kept closed. Always knock on a closed door and wait to be told to enter.

It’s easy to misinterpret certain gestures used by the Dutch, especially if you’re North American. This is because many gestures commonly used in North America have a very different meaning in the Netherlands. Research the variety of gesture differences beforehand.

Consensus guides the decision-making process in most Dutch organizations. Every employee who may be affected will be informed and consulted which creates a more time-consuming process.

Giving compliments is not a part of Dutch business culture. Since most work is done in groups, there is not as much emphasis on recognizing individual effort. When it’s necessary for someone to be praised or criticized, the Dutch usually do this in private.

5 Key Topics to Use in Conversation

  • Your home country or city and points of interest related to them
  • Travel experiences and what you enjoy about travelling
  • The Dutch culture, art, history, architecture, and nature
  • Sports of all kinds – keeping in mind that American soccer is referred to as football
  • Politics – if you know what you’re talking about

5 Key Topics or Gestures to Avoid in Conversation

  • Boasting of any kind about your income and possessions
  • Asking personal questions, family and business are usually kept separate
  • Any criticism of the Dutch Royal Family
  • Legalized prostitution and marijuana in the Netherlands
  • Don’t talk to someone while chewing gum as this is considered rude

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for NORWAY!

To learn more about the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order Gayle’s bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ – now available as an Audio Book on Amazon!

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

 

Website:www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom-Media-Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website:SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Go to: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for the NETHERLANDS

Go to the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SCOTLAND

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Next Page »