Posts tagged with multicultural Communication

Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for JAPAN

Posted on December 8, 2013 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: JAPAN Japan

 

Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos is a brief synopsis of the conversation guidelines for Japan, along with some tips for communicating in Japan, and strategies for doing business in Japan that will help increase your understanding of the Japanese culture. Keep in mind that we are homogenizing as a ‘global culture’ and, as many cultures change and evolve, these cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Punctuality is necessary when doing business in Japan because the Japanese believe it is rude to be late.

Business cards (“meishi”) are an important part of doing business in Japan and key for establishing credentials. It’s preferable to have one side of your card printed in English and the reverse in Japanese.

It is traditional to present your card with the Japanese side facing up, held with both hands between the thumbs and the forefingers. This may be accompanied by a slight bow, which is usually lower based on the age and hierarchy of the person receiving the card. However, don’t be surprised if your Japanese counterpart greets you with a westernized business card exchange!

The Japanese will usually shake hands with Westerners as a way of making them feel comfortable. In turn, it’s helpful for Westerners to bow slightly to demonstrate that they are also taking the initiative to learn some Japanese customs. This simple gesture can do a lot to help a businessperson in establishing rapport with a potential Japanese client.

When receiving a business card, carefully examine it and make an interesting remark about the person’s title or occupation. Then place it on a nearby table during a meeting or in your card case if not meeting at that time. Stuffing it into a pocket is considered disrespectful. Writing on a business card is also inappropriate.

The bow is an important part of Japanese business protocol. Bows are used for expressing appreciation, making apologies and requests, as well as for greetings and farewells. Bows convey both respect and humility.

The depth of the bow depends on the recipient’s rank and status. When bowing to an individual who is of higher status than you, bow a little lower than that person to display deference. Do the same if you are uncertain of the status of the person that you are facing. With a person of your equivalent status, bow at the same height.

Maintaining “correct” relationships between people, and maintaining harmony within groups and teams is considered to be very important.

Be especially respectful to your older Japanese counterparts–age equals rank in the Japanese business culture. When you start speaking, it is polite to direct your first remarks to the most senior member, and then to appropriate individuals.

You may be asked some personal questions regarding your salary, education, and family life. If you don’t want to answer, remain polite and gracefully side step the question.

Be careful when asking the Japanese certain questions. If the response is “maybe”, “possibly”, or “I’ll consider it”, the answer is very possibly “no”. The Japanese prefer to avoid saying “no” directly.

Meanings may be read into even the slightest gestures. Consequently, avoid displaying unusual facial expressions and motioning in ways that are remotely dramatic or expansive.

The American “O.K.” sign (thumb and forefinger shaped into an “O”) actually means “money” in Japan.

Instead of pointing, which is considered rude, use your whole open hand to point.

Blowing one’s nose in public is regarded as impolite. When necessary, use a disposable tissue and then throw it out immediately. The Japanese find the idea of keeping a used handkerchief or tissue in a pocket disgusting.

Laughter may indicate embarrassment or distress, rather than amusement. Smiling can also be used for self-control, particularly in masking displeasure.

It is considered polite to periodically say “I’m sorry.” For example, the Japanese will apologize for not being punctual enough, having a cold, taking you to a disappointing restaurant etc. Visitors are encouraged to incorporate similar apologies into their conversation.

“Saving face” is a very important concept to understand. When a person loses his or her composure or otherwise causes embarrassment, even unintentionally (“losing face”), it can be disastrous for business relationships.

Welcome Topics of Conversation

  • Inquiring about a person’s family (a good conversation starter)
  • Praising the hospitality you’re receiving
  • Japanese history and artistic achievements
  • Positive comments about the Japanese economy
  • Sports, such as golf and ski jumping

Conversation to Avoid

  • World War II
  • Jokes (unless they are very easy to understand, self-deprecating, and made in a social rather than business setting)
  • Criticizing in any form that could cause “loss of face”
  • Ridicule of native social / business rituals and protocol
  • Negative comments about the local sports teams

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for JORDAN!

Website: www.gaylecotton.com 

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Coming on my blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for JAPAN

Coming on the Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SAUDI ARABIA

Check out the Articles Archive Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos’  for countries you may have missed!

Contact EMMY AWARD WINNER, Gayle Cotton, for your next meeting or conference to help you or your company become more successful in today’s global business marketplace. Gayle is the author of the bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communications’ and President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Training & Executive Coaching. Her vast experience living and working abroad will entertain and inspire audiences of any size with her fresh, unique and humorous approach to Cross-Cultural Communications and social business etiquette! Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland as a distinguished professional keynote speaker.

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‘SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!’ is a ‘Featured Sales Guide’ on Amazon!

Posted on November 25, 2013 by Leave a comment

ATTENTION SALESPEOPLE & NEGOTIATORS! My book ‘SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!’ is a ‘Featured Sales Guide’ on Amazon. Book Cover-WSJ-9781118620168_cotton

If you sell or negotiate internationally, I promise this book will greatly assist you.

It’s a perfect holiday read for a friend, co-worker, or yourself!

You can buy it now on Amazon at the following link: ‘Featured Sales Guide: SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!’

“This is a perfect cross-cultural communication tool for anyone who does business globally. Gayle uses interesting and amusing examples to illustrate the hows and whys of effectively sharing messages with someone from another culture. Her naturally friendly writing style addresses delicate issues in a graceful way. Read this book and you’ll be ready to Say Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!”

– Ken Blanchard, coauthor of The One Minute Manager® and Great Leaders Grow

“This is an excellent guide to being more effective and comfortable with different people from different cultures – essential for anyone who travels to other countries.”

– Brian Tracy, Author – The 10 Disciplines of Exceptional Leadership

Read More Endorsements!

Look Inside ‘Say Anything’

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Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for ITALY

Posted on November 11, 2013 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: ITALY SAMSUNG

In the Italian business culture, punctuality is not as much of a priority as in some places. However, it’s best to arrive on time and be prepared to wait.

In many cities there is a long lunch break from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Business may be discussed during lunch.

Be aware of summer vacations in August, as most companies are closed.

You will usually be introduced to older people and women first. When introducing yourself, it’s best to follow this protocol.

Frequent, warm and enthusiastic handshakes are common for both business and social occasions. Italians will also greet people they know well with an embrace.

It’s not unusual to see Italians walking arm in arm or even holding hands in public (men with women, men with men, and women with women).

Italians can be very demonstrative and like to gesture with their arms and hands while talking. There are rare moments of silence and interruptions are common.

Italians have many physical gestures that have very specific meanings. Because of this, avoid hand gestures where fingers are pointed or singled out in a descriptive way so you don’t offend anyone.

In the Italian culture, people are traditionally expected to behave with a sense of decorum and formality. This concept is known as ‘bella figura’ (beautiful figure).

In business, avoid chewing gum, leaning on things, or slouching. Good posture and direct eye contact is important

It’s advisable to wait to be seated at meetings, meals, or gatherings. Take these opportunities to cultivate feelings of respect and trust with your Italian counterparts.

Any presentation materials should be aesthetically pleasing. It’s essential that things look good as appearance is very important.

Hierarchy in business and “cordata” (chain of command) cannot be underestimated. A belief in status and hierarchy permeates all aspects of Italian society. There is tremendous respect for power, authority and age.

Decision making is rather slow and protracted, so be patient since rushing the process will only be an affront to the Italian business protocol.

Honor and personal pride are critical. Never insult an Italian, their family, their town, their friends, or their church (which is predominantly Roman Catholic).

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Tips

  • Italian architecture and  landscape
  • Anything related to Italian art, opera and films
  • Sports, especially soccer
  • The warm Italian hospitality
  • Current events, as long as they are not derogatory to Italy

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Taboos

  • Religion, the Vatican and its policies
  • Politics, taxes, the Mafia and World War II
  • Criticizing the Italian culture, even if your Italian counterparts are doing so
  • Overly personal questions about job and family when you have just met
  • Negative comments about the local soccer team!

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for JAPAN! 

Website: www.gaylecotton.com 

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Currently on my blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos on ITALY!

Currently on the Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos on RUSSIA!

Check out the Articles Archive Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos’  for countries you may have missed!

Contact EMMY AWARD WINNER, Gayle Cotton for your next meeting or conference to help you or your company become more successful in today’s global business marketplace. Gayle is the author of the bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communications’ and President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Training & Executive Coaching. Her vast experience living and working abroad will entertain and inspire audiences of any size with her fresh, unique and humorous approach to Cross-Cultural Communications and social business etiquette! Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland as a distinguished professional keynote speaker.

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Read My Interview in the Toronto Sun: Students Need Cultural IQ!

Posted on October 20, 2013 by Leave a comment

Today’s business world is an ethnic melting pot so be set to jump in the mix

When Nike debuted its tribal tattoo-themed tights this summer, New Zealand consumers were aghast…

Read my Interview at the link below

http://www.thestar.com/life/worldofmbas/2013/09/05/students_need_cultural_iq_experts_say.html

 

Website: www.gaylecotton.com 

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Currently on my blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos on ISRAEL!

Currently on the Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos on PORTUGAL!

Check out the Articles ArchiveCultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos’  for countries you may have missed!

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Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for ISRAEL

Posted on September 22, 2013 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: ISRAEL

Israel 2

Most Israelis speak at a much closer distance than North Americans may be accustomed to so do not move away.

There is also more physical contact, and conversations often involve gestures and touching. Nevertheless, women business travelers should avoid initiating physical contact.

The standard greeting is “Shalom” or a cordial “Hello”, followed by a handshake.

Observant Orthodox Jewish men, whose appearance is usually distinguished by their skullcaps (yarmulkes) or hats and black clothing, do not shake hands with women.

If an Israeli holds your hand, take it graciously as a gesture of friendship.

For Israelis, constant gesturing is acceptable. But pointing is considered rude.

Refrain from any gesture that requires you to extend the thumb, as this is considered offensive (i.e. “thumbs up”/“thumbs down” signs, the hitchhiker’s signal, etc.).

Business cards are considered important, and should be printed in English. As an added touch, some visitors have the reverse side printed in Hebrew.

Given the diverse nature of the population, business practices may reflect North American, European, Russian, or other cultural influences.

Expect business to be straightforward and emphasize the “bottom line.”

In general, the pace of business is slower in Israel than in many places. You will have to exercise patience and tolerance.

Subjective feelings tend to form perceptions of the truth. Faith in the tenets of Judaism, including the conviction that the state must succeed, can also be a profound influence in thinking. Feelings and faith are supplemented by empirical evidence and other substantial facts.

Many Israelis tend to be confrontational and, at times, intensely emotional negotiators.

In the Israeli business culture, it usually takes a longer time to arrive at a final decision.

Israelis may delight in argument and tend to be opinionated. However, you don’t have to feel compelled to openly agree with what they say.

There is a tendency among Israelis to downplay their professional titles.

It’s likely that you will quickly be invited to move to a first-name basis in business.

The Jewish Holy Day, the Sabbath, begins at sunset on Friday and ends at sunset on Saturday.

5 Key Topics or Gestures to Use in Conversation

  • Family, however don’t mix with business
  • Travel is always a good topic
  • Politics (if you know what you are talking about)
  • Sports – especially soccer, basketball and swimming
  • Food and drinks

5 Key Topics or Gestures to Use in Conversation

  • US aid in Israel
  • Religion in general
  • Israel and Palestine
  • Sex and roles of the sexes
  • Any controversial social issue in Israel 

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for ITALY!

Gayle Cotton, International Keynote Speaker & Cultural Expert 

Author of the Bestselling Book: SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!

5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication

www.gaylecotton.com

www.gaylecotton.com/blog

US: 972-370-1300

Check out the Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

Visit the Circles Of Excellence blog featuring

Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: for PORTUGAL

Corporate Training, Executive Coaching, Keynote Speakers

www.circlesofexcellence.com

Contact EMMY AWARD WINNER, Gayle Cotton for your next meeting or conference to help your business become more successful in today’s Global Business Marketplace. Gayle is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Training & Executive Coaching. She is the author of the book ‘SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communications’. She travels worldwide as a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Gayle’s vast experience living and working abroad will entertain and inspire any audience with her fresh, unique and humorous approach to Cross-Cultural Communications! Having worked with companies of all sizes and industries, including 50 Fortune 500 companies, Gayle has successfully helped them grow their businesses internationally. Success in the global business arena can only be accomplished with awareness of the various distinctions in communication styles, business strategies and approaches to cultural etiquette in different countries.

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My article ‘Gestures to Avoid!’ is featured on the Entrepreneurs’ Org. Blog

Posted on September 14, 2013 by Leave a comment

My article ‘Gestures to Avoid in Cross-Cultural Business’, or in other words… ‘Keep Your Fingers to Yourself!’ from the Huffington Post is now being featured on the Entrepreneur’s Organization (EO) Blog ‘Overdrive’. Check it out at the following link:

Gestures to Avoid in Cross-Cultural Business:

http://blog.eonetwork.org/2013/09/gestures-to-avoid-in-cross-cultural-business/

 

My blog:  www.gaylecotton.com/blog

Website: www.gaylecotton.com  

Book website: Say Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Currently on my blog

Article on: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for IRELAND

Currently on the Circles Of Excellence blog

Article on: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for POLAND

Check out the Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

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Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for IRELAND

Posted on August 11, 2013 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: IRELANDIreland-150x150

 

The Irish often have more of a relaxed attitude toward time. As a business traveler, however, you should always strive to be punctual for your appointments.

When meeting the Irish, the proper greeting is to shake hands and extend a warm greeting as you maintain eye contact. Handshakes should also be exchanged upon departure.

The Irish tend to value their personal space and will expect the same of you. If you speak in an animated manner, tone down your hand gestures.

Stand straight and sit with your feet situated flat on the floor. If men or women cross their legs, it shouldn’t be ankle over knee. It is preferable to cross ankle over ankle.

In a conversation between the Irish and visitors to the country, all participants are expected to maintain a low, moderate, tone of voice. Among friends, family, and perhaps closer acquaintances, it’s permissible for the volume and display of emotions to become more pronounced.

The Irish are resolute about their independence from English rule. Consequently, in conversation, refrain from putting Irish culture in the same category as English culture. These kinds of generalizations can jeopardize the business relationship you have worked so hard to establish.

Keep your hands out of your pockets, particularly when speaking.

Avoid using the North American expression, “Have a nice day”. It will come across as sounding questionable.

Pointing is accomplished by using the head or chin, rather than the fingers. Touching one’s nose is a sign of confidentiality. Use the index finger to indicate the number one, and the thumb for number five.

The peace sign or “V” made by extending the index and middle finger with the palm facing out, is an obscene gesture in Ireland and should be avoided.

In larger organizations, the boss is distinguished from others as the key decision-maker and authority figure. Subordinates usually do as they are told and may not express opinions or ideas.

The Irish tend to value a conservative demeanor, yet have an admiration for eccentrics, rebels, and artists.

Fewer women are a part of the higher ranks in Irish business culture, although they are slowly making progress.

If you place a high priority on having a tightly focused meeting, you will have to make some allowances. Generally speaking, the Irish don’t place much emphasis on closely following an agenda.

The Irish are far more animated speakers than the English. They can sometimes be described as prone to the legendary pastime of “blarney”, or embellishing the truth.

The Irish tend to be very “down-to-earth”, so ensure that any information you give is sensible and realistic.

The Irish tend to be polite, attentive listeners and will restrain themselves from interrupting, so do the same.

Don’t put pressure on the decision-making process. Efforts of any kind to obtain direct information or force a faster decision will only damage your relationship.

Welcome Topics of Conversation

  •  Irish writers such as Swift, Yeats, Joyce, Shaw, O’Casey, and Beckett have made great literary contributions. Knowledge and appreciation of Irish literature will ingratiate you with your Irish companions.
  • Your travels in Ireland
  • The Gaelic culture
  • Sports, especially Irish sports  and football (Soccer)
  • Food, drink and fun!

 

Conversation to Avoid

  • Avoid discussing Irish politics
  • Religion and religious differences in Ireland
  • Comparing the lives of the native Irish with Irish-Americans
  • Sex and roles of the sexes
  • Any controversial social issue in Ireland 

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for ISRAEL! 

Gayle Cotton, International Keynote Speaker & Cultural Expert

Author of the Bestselling Book: SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!

5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication

www.gaylecotton.com

www.gaylecotton.com/blog

US: 972-370-1300

 

Check out the Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

Visit the Circles Of Excellence blog featuring

Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: for POLAND

Corporate Training, Executive Coaching, Keynote Speakers

www.circlesofexcellence.com

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Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for IRAN

Posted on June 27, 2013 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: IRAN Iran

 

Although Iran is considered a part of the Middle East, it is important that you do not confuse Iranians with Arabs. Both have different languages, cultures and histories.

The official language of Iran is Persian – known as ‘Farsi’ to Iranians. Although it borrows many words from Arabic, it is a unique language.

Iranians are predominantly Shia Muslims. However, some Azeris, Kurds, Afghans, Beluchis and other ethnic minorities in Iran are Sunni. Shia Islam’s differences with the Sunni variety are limited and sometimes over emphasized.

People should always be mindful of their behavior in public. Clothes should be conservative and non-revealing. Avoid talking loudly. Do not hold hands with the opposite sex in public, unless these are children or older members of the family.

When meeting someone, always shake hands. As a male, you should wait to see if a woman extends her hand. If she doesn’t, then simply nod your head and smile.

When meeting someone for the first time, stick to formalities. Once a relationship has been established, your Iranian counterpart will quickly start to address you with your first name.

As a male in business, you will be expected to dress smartly and conservatively. A suit is standard, although wearing a tie is not necessary.

Women should wear conservative clothing that covers arms, legs and hair. When in public, women must cover their hair with a scarf. However, the last few years has seen incredible changes in what the authorities are willing to tolerate. Women can now be seen wearing make-up, jeans and scarves that barely cover the hair. However, as a foreigner it is best to err on the side of caution.

Business hours are Saturday to Thursday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lunch is usually an hour at around 1 p.m. No business is done on Fridays.

Although many Iranians in business will have a good understanding of English, it is best to arrange for your own interpreter to accompany you.

At the beginning of any meeting, engage in small talk and ask about people’s health, family and work. Wait for your counterpart to initiate the transition in conversation to business matters.

Your success is defined by your ability to build effective personal relationships, combined with a clearly outlined and well-presented proposal.

Building a relationship with your Iranian counterparts is crucial. The first meeting should be focused solely on getting to know each other. Once a relationship has been established, you can move on to business matters.

Iranians are astute businesspeople. They enjoy haggling and getting concessions, so prepare for longer negotiations.

Decision making can be slow. It is most likely that you will meet and negotiate with less senior people first. Once you are seen as trustworthy and your proposal financially viable, you will move on to meet more senior members.

When negotiating, Iranians will start at extremes in order to gage your response. Prior to negotiations, know your target figure and work slowly towards it through meaningful concessions.

5     Key Conversation Tips

  • Iran, it’s language, culture and history
  • Discussing family in a general, non-intrusive way
  • Food, especially the variety of local cuisine
  • Sports, especially Football (Soccer) is always a good topic
  • Professionals will enjoy talking about their education and employment

5     Key Conversation Taboos

  • Questions about Islam, unless they are very simple, inquisitive questions
  • Contentious issues that may lead to heated discussion like the Revolution of 1979, Iranian-US relations, and Israeli foreign and domestic policy
  • Sex and roles of the sexes
  • Personal questions, unless a very close relationship has been established. Also don’t divulge too much personal information about yourself
  • Any negative comments about Iran regarding the leadership, infrastructure or people

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for IRELAND!

Gayle Cotton, International Keynote Speaker & Cultural Expert

Author of the Bestselling Book: SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!

5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication

www.gaylecotton.com

www.gaylecotton.com/blog

US: 972-370-1300

Check out the Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

Visit the Circles Of Excellence blog featuring

Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: for the PHILIPPINES

Corporate Training, Executive Coaching, Keynote Speakers

www.circlesofexcellence.com

Contact EMMY AWARD WINNER, Gayle Cotton for your next meeting or conference to help your business become more successful in today’s Global Business Marketplace. Gayle is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Training & Executive Coaching. She is the author of the book ‘SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communications’. She travels worldwide as a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Gayle’s vast experience living and working abroad will entertain and inspire any audience with her fresh, unique and humorous approach to Cross-Cultural Communications! Having worked with companies of all sizes and industries, including 50 Fortune 500 companies, Gayle has successfully helped them grow their businesses internationally. Success in the global business arena can only be accomplished with awareness of the various distinctions in communication styles, business strategies and approaches to cultural etiquette in different countries.

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Read My Interview About Global Expansion on ‘The Business News Daily’!

Posted on June 23, 2013 by Leave a comment

Busniess News Daily

Read My Interview About Global Expansion on ‘The Business News Daily’!                     

Read my interview on The Business News Daily about how businesses can prepare for global expansion. The topic is covered by a variety of experts!

‘Global Expansion Requires Cultural Preparation’

http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/4429-global-expansion-cultural-preparation.html

My blog:  www.gaylecotton.com/blog

Website: www.gaylecotton.com  

 Book website: Say Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Coming soon on my blog

My new article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for IRAN

Currently on the Circles Of Excellence blog

The article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for PERU

Check out the Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

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News Flash! New Article Featured on the Huffington Post Business Blog!

Posted on June 17, 2013 by Leave a comment

Huffington PostGestures to Avoid in Cross-Cultural Business:

In Other Words, ‘Keep Your Fingers to Yourself!’

A new article is featured on the Huffington Post Business Blog. My Wiley publicist is keeping me busy!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gayle-cotton/cross-cultural-gestures_b_3437653.html

Let me know how you liked the article.

Happy Travels!

My blog:  www.gaylecotton.com/blog

Website: www.gaylecotton.com  

 Book website: Say Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Coming soon on my blog

My new article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for IRAN

Currently on the Circles Of Excellence blog

The article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for PERU

Check out the Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

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