Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: A Touch of Grace

Touch of Grace-Queen-Mich Obama

To touch or not to touch! How about a touch of grace? Cultural etiquette, politeness, and good manners are passed down through societies from generation to generation. Etiquette refers to the cultural guidelines for what is appropriate or inappropriate and polite or impolite. It gives a culture structure, integrity, grace, and finesse—all of which are […]

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Not Knowing = Not Selling! How to Sell to Different Cultures

Not Selling

Not Knowing = Not Selling! How to Sell to Different Cultures In today’s global business marketplace, the ability to sell to and communicate effectively with different cultures cannot be underestimated. I found this out very quickly when I lived and worked in Switzerland. I didn’t expect that there would be specific things about me that […]

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Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for RUSSIA

Russia2

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: RUSSIA The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for Russia is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Russia, tips for communicating in Russia, and strategies for doing business with Russia to help with understanding the […]

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Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: A Touch of Grace

Posted on January 24, 2015 by Leave a comment

To touch or not to touch! How about a touch of grace?

Touch of Grace-Queen-Mich ObamaCultural etiquette, politeness, and good manners are passed down through societies from generation to generation. Etiquette refers to the cultural guidelines for what is appropriate or inappropriate and polite or impolite. It gives a culture structure, integrity, grace, and finesse—all of which are uniquely adapted from one culture to another. Fortunately, simple business and social etiquette are often based on basic common sense. Although etiquette styles and fads may come and go, the fundamentals of global etiquette remain essentially the same.

Often I’m asked about cultural ‘faux pas’, especially as they relate to gestures and touching someone in a way that breaks cultural protocol. This unintentional breach of protocol happens frequently, and will continue to happen, however the real etiquette come into play when the breach is handled with such grace and dignity that the breach dissolves unnoticed! Two examples of this come to mind.

Recently when Prince William and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, were presented with a Cleveland Cavaliers T-shirt for Prince George by LaBron James, LaBron put his arm around Kate’s shoulder for the photo, unaware that touching the royal family has been known to break the accepted protocol. Neither Prince William nor Kate showed any sign of being uncomfortable with LaBron’s gesture, showing instead dignity and a touch a grace.

Another similar situation happened in March 2012 when President Obama and the First Lady meet Queen Elizabeth in England. In this case, the Queen first extended her arm to touch Michelle Obama’s back, at which point Mrs. Obama responded in like creating an embrace between the two. The British media was abuzz with this show of affection by the Queen who had not publically displayed this sort of affection in 57 years! From the perspective of “rapport”, perhaps the Queen was welcoming Mrs. Obama in the manner more typically comfortable for the U.S. than England. Traditionally, the protocol would be to follow the customs of etiquette for the country you are in, however Queen Elizabeth and the First lady showed that doing things differently can be just fine!

A touch of grace happens when we let go of traditional cultural expectations and connect on the level of the culture we have in common – the ‘Human Culture’. As we begin 2015, perhaps we can focus more on what we have in common rather than on our differences. The following 7 tips will help us do just that!

  • Be respectful: Respect is a universal language!
  • Show you care: Learn what’s important to the cultures you visit or work with
  • Strike a balance: Find the comfortable middle ground between cultures. No one expects you to be just like them!
  • Know your geography: There is nothing more embarrassing than not knowing the location of a country and its neighbors!
  • Mind your manners: Learn what is considered polite and impolite for the countries you visit
  • Learn how to greet: Greetings are as diverse as the cultures themselves. There are handshakes, kisses, hugs, and bows, and they come in all different sizes!
  • Show a touch of grace: Differences are the spice of life! When it comes to cultural etiquette, no one expects perfection. Enjoy yourself, and it’s highly likely your counterparts will do the same!

To learn more about the Dos and Taboos for different cultures, and the communication styles of Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order Gayle Cotton’s bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for what you may have missed!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this blog and of the bestselling cross-cultural communication book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle if you need professional speakers for events, speakers on cultural diversity, conference speakers for events, or professional keynote speakers that specialize in cross-cultural communication training and cross-cultural training programs. She is a leader in the industry of professional public speakers and professional motivational speakers. She is among the best of female keynote speakers, women motivational speakers, and international keynote speakers. Gayle is a cross-cultural speaker that is an expert on social business etiquette, and she is sure to please any audience with her charm, wit, and humor!

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for RUSSIA

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

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Not Knowing = Not Selling! How to Sell to Different Cultures

Posted on January 18, 2015 by Leave a comment

Not Knowing = Not Selling!

How to Sell to Different Cultures Not Selling

In today’s global business marketplace, the ability to sell to and communicate effectively with different cultures cannot be underestimated. I found this out very quickly when I lived and worked in Switzerland. I didn’t expect that there would be specific things about me that would have a negative impact when promoting my company’s Cross-Cultural Training Seminars. However, I found out very quickly that I had 3 very specific strikes against me. First I was American, and their attitude was “what could an American teach them about culture?” Second I was female, and there are still considerably fewer business women at high levels in Swiss business. Third I was blonde, and yes — the dumb blonde jokes are global! I decided that I needed to adapt my image and my communication approach to better fit their expectations. That consisted of classic, professional suits; hair in a French twist, and high heels since I’m short. For a group of senior bankers in Zurich, I even wore fake eyeglasses! I also changed my communication style to be more factual, direct, and to the point, something which the Swiss appreciate. I smiled less, minimized my tonal modulations, and was less demonstrative in my body language, gestures, and facial expressions. And – it worked!

Now, you don’t have to travel outside the United States to experience this. The U.S. is a melting pot of people from all over the world. And even though the standard rule ‘When in Rome – do as the Romans’ may apply, we sometimes don’t position ourselves in the best light, and subtly rub someone the wrong way with our actions, gestures, communication style, or even perhaps how we look.

Common Cr0ss-Cultural Mistakes That Are Made When Developing Transcultural Relationships

  • Not being proactive and not adapting to different cultural business expectations. It’s all too easy to get off on the wrong foot and become reactive – especially in the sales process.
  • Not knowing how formality, hierarchy, and timing can affect business interactions, the sales process, and decision making with different cultures. These things can have a tremendous impact on negotiations. Not knowing = not selling.
  • Having your enthusiasm perceived as aggressive, impatient, or even arrogant! Developing a sales relationship often takes longer with different cultures, especially in other countries, so plan accordingly.
  • Coming across as egocentric or too ‘I’ oriented. Many cultures are more team focused or ‘we’ oriented than the typical salesperson in the U.S. This can also greatly impact your choice of marketing style and material.
  • Unintentionally offending someone with your choice of body language or gestures. This is one of the biggest cultural taboos, and can be very difficult to recover from. A basic guideline is to use open- handed gestures. Don’t point with your index finger, don’t use the OK sign, and don’t use the thumbs up or thumbs down gestures. They are likely to subtly offend someone somewhere – even in the U.S.

How can you proactively prepare for multicultural sales?

Awareness is the 1st step! Observe how people communicate with you in person, on the phone, and by email. Notice if they are more formal and expressive, or more direct and to the point. They are telling you how they like to be communicated with so model their style.

If doing business in another country — know your facts. Be aware of the relevant historical data, economic issues, major industries, and geography to name a few. There is nothing more embarrassing than not knowing your facts or geography!

To develop cultural rapport, learn what is important to other cultures. For example, it made international headlines a few years ago when Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah visited President Bush at his Crawford ranch. They were photographed strolling hand in hand through the bluebonnet garden. This was an important sign of their friendship and trust. Sometimes you may even need to go a bit beyond your comfort zone to establish rapport!

Know a few words in the language of the country. 5 simples phrases: “My name is”, “Nice to meet you”, “Please”, “Thank you”, and “Sorry, I only speak a little of your language”. Another phrase that will always be useful is the toast of the land, “Cheers!”

Keep in mind that we are blending and homogenizing into a global culture, so even with all the knowledge we acquire, we can’t ever take cultural tendencies for granted. As soon as you do — you’ll be surprised by something completely unexpected!  That’s why observation and awareness is so important.

5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication

  1. Create Proactive Communication: Stay out of the reactive cycle. Focus on positioning yourself, your product, and your company so that it facilitates partnerships and trust. This is an important first step before jumping into the business at hand.
  2. Rapport Secrets: Adapt your marketing material, sales style, and business approach to the cultural preferences of the customer.
  3. Organize Productive Interactions: Work towards collaboration and a ‘win-win’ outcome for all parties. This helps to avoid conflict and cultural sensitivities. It establishes trust, and influences decision-makers.
  4. Strategies for Relationships: Create strategies based on cultural expectations, and incorporate the appropriate level of formality. Understand the business hierarchy, the decision making protocol, and the timing necessary for sales cycles.
  5. Success Leaves Clues: Learn the Dos and Taboos of the country and cultures you sell to and partner with. Notice what works and what doesn’t. Change your approach based on the results, and enjoy the process!

Bon Voyage… Cheers to successful multicultural sales in 2015!

To learn more about the Dos and Taboos for different cultures, and the communication styles of Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order Gayle Cotton’s bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for what you may have missed!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this blog and of the bestselling cross-cultural communication book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence Inc. and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle if you need conference speakers for events, speakers on cultural diversity, or professional keynote speakers that specialize in cross-cultural communication training and cross-cultural training programs. She is a leader in the industry of professional motivational speakers and professional public speakers. Known for her cross-cultural communication books and intercultural training, she is among the best of female keynote speakers, women motivational speakers, and international keynote speakers. She is a cross-cultural speaker and expert on social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide, entertaining, educating, and inspiring audiences with her fresh and unique style, and is sure to please any audience with her charm, wit, and humor!

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for RUSSIA

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

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Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos: Communication Guidelines for RUSSIA

Posted on January 11, 2015 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: RUSSIARussia2

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for Russia is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Russia, tips for communicating in Russia, and strategies for doing business with Russia to help with understanding the culture in Russia. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Addresses in Russia are written in the following order: (1) country (2) city (3) street address and (4) the last name of the individual.

Handshaking is common and is typically a firm grip with several quick pumps between two men. Between men and women, or two women, the handshake is usually softer. It’s appropriate for men to wait until a woman extends her hand before reaching for it. Between women, the older woman extends her hand first.

Russians are a very demonstrative people, and public physical contact is common. Hugs, backslapping, kisses on the cheeks, and other expressive gestures are common among friends and relatives when greeting.

When a Russian touches another person during a greeting or conversation, it is usually a sign of confidence and rapport.

Generally speaking, Russians are more comfortable with third-party introductions, so it’s best to wait a moment before introducing yourself to a new group. If, after a few minutes, no introduction is made you may then take the initiative.

Eye contact during the introduction is very important and should be maintained as long as the individual is addressing you.

Visitors should speak in a calm moderate tone of voice since speaking or laughing loudly in public is frowned upon.

Personal questions are best avoided, although you may be subject to these inquiries. Answer these questions as best as you are willing to since your Russian companions may press you for details.

There is tremendous affection for children in Russia. If you are a parent, showing photographs of your children can be an effective way of building rapport.

In conversation, it is helpful to discuss your aspirations and hopes for the future. Sometimes, Russians are far more interested in the personal side of your character than your business agenda.

Allow plenty of time for each appointment. Not only may appointments start late, they may last longer than originally planned.

The Russian business culture has a deeply entrenched hierarchy. Superiors have authority over their subordinates, and are ultimately responsible for the final decision.

It’s essential that you deal with the key decision-makers, rather than the go-betweens who are often sent to meet with new visitors. It’s wise to plan ahead and make the right contacts well in advance of your trip.

When decision-makers are present, meetings can be a time for all participants to exchange information and ideas.

Ensure that you have a contact outside of the negotiations who is an expert in Russian law, which is constantly subject to change in both interpretation and application.

The first meeting is usually more of a formality, a time for the Russians to assess the credibility of you and your company. The best strategy is to appear very firm and dignified, while maintaining an air of warmth and approachability.

It’s essential that your business team display a “united front” when negotiating with the Russians. A good way to start is by ensuring that all members of your team understand and agree on precisely what they want to achieve from the deal.

While strong empirical evidence and other factual data are important in any presentation, making a trustworthy impression is an important priority with Russians.

Extend compliments with caution, since they may cause Russians to feel a sense of misplaced obligation. Praising and rewarding anyone in public may be viewed with suspicion.

Your Russian counterparts may insist that they understand something while this may not actually be the case. They also sometimes have a tendency to say things they think you want to hear.

The Russian word “nyekulturny” is a popular term used to refer to anything considered uncultured, bad mannered, or otherwise socially unacceptable. The taboos below are a few examples of some behaviors regarded as “nyekulturny.”

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Tips

  • The rapid, progressive changes taking place in Russia
  • Culture, theatre, movies, music, and literature
  • Travel, history, and architecture
  • There is always an interest in current events as long as you remain open to various perspectives
  • The food and drink that is unmistakably a part of Russian entertainment

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Taboos

  • Wearing your coat inside office buildings or public places. Coatrooms are usually available and should be used.
  • Standing with your hands in your pockets
  • Sitting with the legs apart, or with one ankle resting upon the knee
  • Comparing Russia to other developing countries, or comparing Moscow and Saint Petersburg
  • Beckoning someone with the forefinger. Instead, turn your hand so that the palm faces down and make a scratching motion. Many common gestures used in the West, such as the “OK” sign, are considered rude in Russia.

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for SAUDI ARABIA!

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for Russia, doing business in Russia, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book 

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for RUSSIA

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

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New Year Traditions Around the World from New York to Japan!

Posted on January 3, 2015 by Leave a comment

New Year Traditions Around the World from New York to Japan! New Year-GC-14,15

  • Times Square Celebrations The first Ball Lowering celebration atop One Times Square was held on December 31, 1907 and is now a worldwide symbol of the turn of the New Year, seen via satellite by more than one billion people each year. The original New Year’s Eve Ball weighed 700 pounds and was 5 feet in diameter. It was made of iron and wood and was decorated with 100 25-watt light bulbs.
  • Foods It was thought that one could affect the luck they would have throughout the coming year by what they did or ate on the first day of the year. It is still held in some regions that special New Year foods are the harbingers of luck. For that reason, the Dutch believe that eating donuts on New Year’s Day will bring good fortune. The hog, and its meat, is considered lucky because it symbolizes prosperity. Cabbage is another “good luck” vegetable that is consumed on New Year’s Day by many. Cabbage leaves are also considered a sign of prosperity, being representative of paper currency. In some regions, rice is a lucky food that is eaten on New Year’s Day. The ancient Persians gave New Year’s gifts of eggs, which symbolized productiveness.
  • Black-eyed peas Many parts of the U.S. celebrate the new year by consuming black-eyed peas. These legumes are typically accompanied by either hog jowls or ham. Black-eyed peas and other legumes have been considered good luck in many cultures.
  • Rings Many cultures believe that anything in the shape of a ring is good luck, because it symbolizes “coming full circle,” completing a year’s cycle. Wearing new slippers In China, many people wear in the new year a new pair of slippers that is bought before the new year, because it means to step on the people who gossip about you.
  • Sealed doors & windows During new year , the doors and windows of every home in china can be seen sealed with paper. The Chinese think that this will succeed in keep the evil demons out.
  • Jewish New Year The Jewish New Year is called Rosh Hashanah. It is a holy time when Jews recall the things they have done wrong in the past, and then promise to do better in the future. Special services are held in the synagogues, children are given new clothes and New Year loaves are baked to remind people of harvest time.
  • American resolutions 40 to 45% of American adults make one or more New Year’s resolutions each year. And these range from debt reduction to giving up bad habits to what not? But the ones that are the most common deal with weight loss to exercise to giving up smoking.
  • Japanese New Year On New Year’s Day in Japan, everyone gets dressed in their new clothes. Homes are decorated with pine branches and bamboo, both of which are considered to be the symbols of long life. For more New Year’s Traditions – Check out the Circles Of Excellence blog!

To learn about the Do’s and Taboos for international business, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order Gayle Cotton’s bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this post and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

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Great Article ‘Business Travel Tips for Mexico’ Is Posted on About.com

Posted on December 27, 2014 by Leave a comment

ABOUT.COM: Business Travel Tips for Mexico      Mexico Business        

The interview on ‘Business Travel Tips for Mexico’ is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Mexico, tips for communicating in Mexico, and strategies for doing business with Israel to help with understanding the culture in Mexico. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step when it comes to tips for intercultural communication!

Interview Links:

Cultural Tips for Mexico

http://businesstravel.about.com/od/resources/fl/Cultural-Tips-for-Doing-Business-in-Mexico.htm

To learn more about the Do’s and Taboos for Mexico, doing business in Mexico, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order Gayle Cotton’s bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this post and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Video clips: Speaker preview for Gayle Cotton

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Currently on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for PORTUGAL

Currently on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

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Check Out the New Photos from My Trip to New York on My Website!

Posted on December 22, 2014 by Leave a comment

Photo Gallery – Work, Travel, and Fun! Xmas-2-Gayle admires the clock at the Waldorf Astoria

There are new pictures on my web photo gallery ‘Work, Travel, and Fun!’ from my recent trip to New York City. I was once again there for speaking engagements and to promote my Audio Book SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ (available on Amazon). As you can see, I also found some time to do some Christmas chopping in the city. There is nothing like New York at Christmas!

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Video clips: Speaker preview for Gayle Cotton

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for PORTUGAL

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

To learn about the Do’s and Taboos for international business, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order Gayle Cotton’s bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

 

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this post and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

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Season Greetings for Happy Holidays in Languages from Around the World

Posted on December 13, 2014 by 1 Comment

HH-SMI wish all my customers, client, and friends from around the world a happy and healthy holiday season!

I am heading to New York City to enjoy all the festivities there, so watch for pictures to be posted next year!

 Happy Holidays! In South African (Xhose): Ii holide eximnandi

Happy Holidays! In German: Forhe Feiertage

Happy Holidays! In Dutch: Prettige feestdagen

Happy Holidays! In Hawaiian: Hau’oli Lanui

Happy Holidays! In Gaelic: Beannachtaí na Féile

Happy Holidays! In Slovenian: Vesele Praznike

Happy Holidays! In Indonesian: Selamat Hari Raya!

Happy Holidays! In Croatian: Sretni praznici!

Happy Holidays! In French: Joyeuses Fêtes!

Happy Holidays! In Spanish: Felices Fiestas!

Happy Holidays! In Swedish: Trevlig Helg!

Happy Holidays! In Portuguese: Boas Festas!

Happy Holidays! In Turkish: Mutlu Bayramlar!

Happy Holidays! In Romanian: Sarbatori Fericite!

Happy Holidays! In Mandarin: Jie Ri Yu Kuai

Happy Holidays! In Catalan: Bones Festes!

Happy Holidays! In Japanese: Shiawasena kyūjitsu

Happy Holidays! In Italian: Buone Feste!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this post and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Video clips: Speaker preview for Gayle Cotton

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Currently on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for PORTUGAL

Currently on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

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Great Article ‘Business Travel in Israel’ Is Posted on About.com

Posted on December 6, 2014 by Leave a comment

ABOUT.COM: Business Travel Tips for Israel       Israel

The interview on ‘Business Travel Tips for Israel’ is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Israel, tips for communicating in Israel, and strategies for doing business with Israel to help with understanding the culture in Israel. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step when it comes to tips for intercultural communication!

Interview Links:

Cultural Tips for Israel

http://businesstravel.about.com/od/resources/fl/Cultural-Tips-for-Doing-Business-in-Israel.htm?nl=1

To learn more about the Do’s and Taboos for Israel, doing business in Israel, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order Gayle Cotton’s bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this post and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Video clips: Speaker preview for Gayle Cotton

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Currently on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for PORTUGAL

Currently on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

 

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Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos: Communication Guidelines for PORTUGAL

Posted on November 22, 2014 by Leave a comment

The Latest! Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos – A Series of Cultural Tips for Countries from A to Z: PORTUGAL Portugal2

The article ‘Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for Portugal is a brief snapshot of conversation guidelines for Portugal, tips for communicating in Portugal, and strategies for doing business with Portugal to help with understanding the culture in Portugal. It’s important to keep in mind that as we homogenize as a ‘global culture’, cultural tendencies change and evolve as well. Awareness is the first step!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

Cultural Tips for Portugal

Business travel tips for Portugal that will pave the way!

When doing business in Portugal, conversation is somewhat informal, however still more formal than in the US when first meeting. It’s best to begin more formal, and then adapt to a more casual style as the relationship develops.

You can assume that most Portuguese business contacts will speak some English. They will also typically understand Spanish however Spanish speakers won’t necessarily understand Portuguese, because the pronunciation is especially difficult.

It’s typical to shake hands when greeting, and on a first meeting to exchange business cards. There may be more touching of arms or hands during handshake introductions that in northern European or the US cultures.

Developing good personal relationships is very important in business and will often be at least as significant a factor as the product or service you are offering.

People stand closer in conversation than in North America Northern Europe and maintain good eye contact.

In general, the Portuguese are relaxed about etiquette and public behavior, however it is considered impolite to stretch in public. Being polite and well behaved is what really matters.

Do not launch straight into the business at hand. Allow some time for small talk about business in general, about soccer, about the weather, or about your personal life and family.

If you want to get to know your business partners better, invite them for a cup of coffee, lunch, or dinner. This should be a time to socialize, so don’t bring up business unless they do first.

The Portuguese are rather reserved and prefer to avoid confrontation or verbal directness. You may find it difficult to get definite answers to all your questions. Try to get information by analyzing the statements being made.

Meetings tend to run long, and do not necessarily keep to an agenda or timetable. Gently focus the discussion or bring it to closure, but allow plenty of room for people to say what they have to say.

Never shout or lose your temper–it doesn’t work and ends up putting you in a weaker position.

The Portuguese have an instinct to please which also produces a tendency to say what they think you want to hear. Make sure you get specifics and quantification.

For negotiations, the key is patience and a willingness to educate your business partners about your way of doing things. The ‘carrot’ is generally more effective than the ‘stick’.

Overall, there is a willingness to be flexible and to learn. There is respect and admiration for more advanced methods and economies. You will find that there is considerable creativity and drive to resolve problems and adaptation to circumstances.

Status is important to the Portuguese. The use of academic titles and distinctions are very common. Job title and rank are less significant, although it is important to know the business hierarchy and who really makes the decision.

Consensus and a ‘win-win’ attitude is typically the underlying philosophy. The Portuguese are uncomfortable with explicitly competitive positions.

Teamwork may be weaker than in some cultures, because the Portuguese don’t like challenging authority. They also tend first to analyze their personal interest in an action or deal, so understanding ‘hidden agendas’ is an important skill.

The most important environmental factor is the bureaucracy and weak justice system. Labor laws are very tough, and there is a culture of state involvement in business and collectivist policies.

Portuguese businesspeople are expert at dealing with the last minute crisis. There is always someone around who will fix it or find a creative way through. Of course, the solution may not be completely inadequate–but a solution will be found.

Make sure you clarify specific and realistic deadlines and performance measures. ‘Tomorrow’ and ‘next week’ are relative terms in Portuguese. You’ll have to confirm that the deadlines are on track before you find that they have come and gone.

It’s necessary to have all agreements and commitments in writing, even if only an e-mail confirmation. Avoid writing anything in red ink, even small notes, because only school teachers correcting work are ‘allowed’ to write in red–otherwise it’s considered offensive.

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Tips

  • Soccer is a favorite topic of most all Portuguese
  • Food and wine, especially Portuguese wine
  • Family, your home, and children
  • Culture, music, and literature
  • Travel, history, and architecture

5 Key Conversation or Gesture Taboos

  • Religion, and all the usual controversial subjects
  • Politics in general
  • Personal finances, salary, career positions etc.
  • Personal compliments early in the relationship
  • Sports, other than soccer, may not be well recognized by some Portuguese

Bon Voyage! 

Join us in the future for Russia!

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for Portugal, doing business in Portugal, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for PORTUGAL

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

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What World Leaders and Business Travelers Need to Know About Visiting China!

Posted on November 15, 2014 by Leave a comment

Cultural Tips for Visiting China

What World Leaders and Business Travelers Need to Know!  China-Obama-APEC-11-14

Success leaves clues, or in this case the lack of success leaves clues! Throughout history we’ve witnessed presidential “faux pas”, and this time President Obama added himself to the list when arriving in Beijing for the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

He can be excused for choosing the security of a U.S. supplied vehicle over the Chinese-provided limousine service, however when he emerged from his vehicle chewing gum, I had to question the cultural preparation he had received for his visit. Although he frequently chews Nicorette gum to manage his smoking habit, this doesn’t bode well with the formal standards of the Chinese party leadership. He was unfortunately characterized as an “idler” and “rapper” on Chinese social media.

Chewing gum is considered impolite in China, but chewing gum wasn’t the only misstep. Upon his arrival, he shook hands and patted the backs of the Chinese delegates who greeted him. While those pats on the back are considered a sign of comradery and friendship in the U.S., they aren’t appreciated the same way in the Chinese culture.

The Chinese Communist Party launched a six-month campaign to educate the Beijing delegation on how to behave when welcoming world leaders for its biggest international event since the 2008 Summer Olympics. It was surprising that the leader of the most powerful nation in the world was the first to make headlines for cultural missteps.

A few tips on the cultural protocol in China could have avoided this embarrassment. World leaders and business travelers alike should keep the following points in mind when visiting China.

  • Avoid using any excessively demonstrative behavior or gesture. Don’t raise your voice too loud, or snap your fingers, wink, or whistle.
  • Chewing gum in public — especially at official or formal occasions, is considered impolite and uncultured.
  • China is not a “touching” culture, so avoid back patting, putting an arm around someone’s shoulders, hugs, and so on.
  • Handshaking is done with a rather gentle grip because a very firm handshake suggests aggression.
  • Good eye contact is appropriate, although it won’t be prolonged. The Chinese culture is taught to avert their eyes to avoid the intimidation.
  • Point with an open hand because pointing with an index finger is considered impolite.
  • Don’t blow your nose in a handkerchief or tissue and then put it in your pocket or handbag. This is considered unsanitary.
  • Don’t cause any type of embarrassment that could result in “loss of face”. “Face” is a bankable notion that is literally a statement of a person’s value.
  • Gentlemen — don’t cross your legs with your foot resting on your knee. It is considered disrespectful, and you may inadvertently point the sole of your shoe at someone – a real insult!

Emmy Award Winner, Gayle Cotton, is the author of this article and of the bestselling book, SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’, available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book. She is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Education, and a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Contact Gayle to be a conference speaker for your events! She is a cross cultural expert that will entertain and inspire audiences of all sizes with her fresh, unique, and humorous approach to cross-cultural communication and social business etiquette. Gayle travels worldwide from business bases in Texas and Switzerland.

To learn more about the Do’s & Taboos for international business, and the communication and business styles of Asia/Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East – order my bestselling book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication’ available on Amazon as a Book, eBook, or Audio Book

Create Rapport and Organize Strategies for Success

The CROSS of Cross-Cultural

Check out the ARTICLE ARCHIVE ‘Cultural Clues Do’s and Taboos’ for countries you may have missed!

Contact Gayle for More Information

Website: www.gaylecotton.com

MEDIA: Newsroom Media Interviews

Circles Of Excellence website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Book website: SAY Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Soon on: Gayle’s blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for PORTUGAL

Soon on the: Circles Of Excellence blog

Cross-cultural article: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for SOUTH AFRICA

Article archives for what you’ve missed! Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos

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